Level Up!

russian1With the release of Chinese and Russian Levels 4 and 5, the total number of Rosetta Stone language levels available in Rosetta Stone Version 3 or Rosetta Stone Version 4 TOTALe now stands at 105 (including seven military-specific levels). That’s a fantastic achievement, since it’s been only four years since the first Version 3 language levels hit the market. These new languages and revisions of our former Version 2 courses demonstrate our ongoing commitment to improving and expanding our language-learning solution.

Some people talk about the relative ease or difficulty of learning a language in terms of how much your second language differs from your first. The beauty of the Rosetta Stone method is that we attempt to bridge that gap by mimicking the way you learned your first language. That means our approach relies on our in-house content experts (CEs) effectively converting difficult concepts into straightforward examples using pictures, text, and sound. We do the work so you can have the fun!

chineseTwo of the CEs that worked on the newly released Chinese and Russian levels, Cecilia Schwedhelm and Alexandra Loginov, shared some of their experiences with me. “We discussed a large number of complex issues while creating Russian Levels 4 and 5,” said Alexandra. “Imagine trying to teach the concept of to doubt using only pictures, text, and sound!”

“Teaching the family relationships in Chinese was a real challenge,” said Cecilia. “All the names for family members are different based on exactly how they’re related to you. It’s very complicated. Think about teaching specific terms for your mother’s older brother or your father’s younger sister and how many variations are possible.”

Throughout the process of building these courses, each CE spent thousands of hours poring over every screen and resolving many linguistic and technical issues in order to make the learning experience the best it can be. Those of you currently working through Levels 1–3 of these languages may notice that some activities require you to reset your score if you repeat the activity.  This is because we made substantial changes to the content. These improvements are part of our ongoing pursuit of language-learning perfection. Don’t worry—if you continue your progress, the content changes will be seamless. We wholeheartedly hope you enjoy your language-learning journey, and we hope you’ll join us online in Rosetta Studio and Rosetta World!

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Aaron Kishbaugh

Aaron Kishbaugh is the content lead for Rosetta Stone TOTALe™, and he was most recently senior manager of the Rosetta Stone Content Development Editorial Team. He joined the company in 2006 and has worked on the Rosetta Stone Teachers’ Guides, Rosetta Stone Version 3 Irish, TOTALe Companion™, and many other projects. Prior to his employment at Rosetta Stone, Aaron worked with non-profit security organizations in Washington, D.C., mapped Brazil and Argentina for a digital mapping firm, and lived and worked in Mozambique. He has an MA in Conflict Transformation from Eastern Mennonite University and a BS in Environmental Science from Wheaton College, where he also studied German.
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